Learning Secondary SchoolPage 2

Secondary School

Head’s Welcome

I am delighted to extend the warmest of welcome to the Secondary School webpage and on behalf of the Secondary NCBIS staff and students, we hope you find our site helpful and comprehensive.

Our NCBIS website aim is to provide regularly updated information on the latest news and events in the school both academically and pastorally, as well as to share our aims and ethos. We recognise that the quality of learning, as well as our unique, friendly and caring atmosphere can never be fully explained on paper, so we invite you to come in and meet us at NCBIS as soon as possible. By taking a tour of our campus, you will see our world class, global citizens in the making. As the majority of teaching staff at NCBIS are also parents and international travellers, we understand that choosing the right school for your children is an essential part of any relocation, therefore you have my assurance that we will help support you in the most professional and understanding manner possible.

David Mate, Head of Secondary

My wife and I have taught in the UK, Qatar and now Egypt, so we, as well as many of our teachers, can anticipate and also respond to the queries that you may have. The NCBIS staff body are always here to help, both as passionate educators and also as members of a close-knit, expat community, eager to help you settle in and enjoy this historic country and dynamic city.

Our students’ performance in public examinations at NCBIS is something that we are interminably proud of. Fortunately, year after year, we have received positive affirmation that our students perform better than ‘similar’ counterparts across the world and both our GCSE and IB results are well above the UK national averages. It is our belief that our strong pastoral program supports students at NCBIS to achieve this academic potential.

However, there is so much more to education and learning than examinations results. Simply browsing our weekly newsletters will demonstrate that our academic achievements and world class IB Results are complemented by the activities outside of the classroom. This is an incredibly industrious, innovative and progressive school; we excel in educating “the whole child” and in doing so fulfilling our key aim, which is “to bring out the best in everyone”, so that each and every student is fully prepared for the world of work or to continue their education at the next level. Our list of university destinations speaks for itself, but what matters most is that the children in our care feel safe, secure and supported and overall are able to thrive in a multi-cultural community that recognises and celebrates individuality and encourages tolerance and respect.

Whether you are a prospective or existing parent, I would like to invite you to contact us with any questions that you may have, and cordially invite you to stop by the Secondary School office to get a better understanding of how the NCBIS team works together for the benefit of our students and the wider international community. No question is too small and we are here to help you whenever you need us. It would be a pleasure to meet you soon.

David Mate
Head of Secondary School

david.mate@ncbis.co.uk

Pastoral Support

We are proud of the positive relationships our students enjoy with each other and with their teachers and we value highly the happiness and well-being of each child in our care. Supportive and positive relationships are of key importance in our culturally diverse and often transient international community and it is vital that students settle quickly, and feel at ease in their school life and new environment.

In order to support our students, NCBIS offers a range of pastoral care which underpins the academic programme and helps students achieve their full personal and educational potential.

The Tutor System

Each student is part of a tutor group which is cared for by a tutor and co-tutor. Students meet their tutors every morning and have further contact with them as part of the Personal, Social and Health Education (PSHE) programme. The tutor oversees the social and academic progress of their tutor group and is a first point of contact to help with worries or concerns , as well as to celebrate achievements and successes of their tutees.

The work of our team of tutors is led by the Deputy Head (Pastoral), in conjunction with Heads of Key Stage, who together provide further sources of support and advice for both students and parents.

Personal Social and Health Education

The PSHE programme is designed to equip students with the knowledge and skills which will help them deal with the range of choices, opportunities and challenges faced by young people today. The programme in each year group focuses on issues of particular relevance to the age and stage of education of the students and addresses matters such as friendship, cyberbullying, healthy lifestyle, interview skills, careers and education for employability.

Attendance and Applications for Authorised Leave of Absence

Regular attendance and a good record of punctuality are essential foundations for an effective learning and teaching environment in which every student can thrive. Good attendance is fundamental to sound academic and social progress and development. Not surprisingly, educational research shows a close correlation between good attendance and attainment.

In an increasingly competitive world of work, attendance, as well as punctuality, is also valued by us as it develops patterns of behaviour important for personal and professional success later in life. Whilst we would like to expect 100% attendance rate, we recognise that on occasion a child will be absent for medical reasons or other exceptional circumstances such as family illness or bereavement. Should parents know of an absence in advance, we would ask that you complete a “Request for Authorised Leave of Absence Form” and return it to your child’s tutor.

Our PSHE programme is bespoke planned to suit our unique international community and is reviewed on a yearly basis. This is to ensure it is up-to-date with modern issues in line with DFE statutory guidance (2019).

Mentoring and Support

The Secondary school has a skilled pastoral team consisting of Head of Key Stage, a school counsellor and a secondary mentor. Counselling and mentoring support can be offered to those learners who need it either as a ‘drop-in’ in or as regular scheduled meetings, depending on need. We recognise that secondary school is a crucial time for students to build effective routines, develop positive and resilient attitudes towards school, as well as learn behaviours that will enhance their socio-behavioural skills and enjoyment of school.

How does the Secondary Mentor support?

    • Provides guidance, motivation, emotional support, social support, behavioural support, goal-setting & CBT.
    • Develops contacts/liaises with the Inclusive learning team and the school counsellor as well as the Heads of Key Stage and Deputy Head (Student Welfare).
    • Identifies and builds up a bank of relevant resources for each individual student. Equipping them with a ‘toolkit’ that can be drawn from in order to best approach new and challenging situations.

2019-2020 Leave of Absence Form

Curriculum

The secondary curriculum at NCBIS aims to prepare our students for the rapidly changing world where skills, values, attitudes and attributes are as important as knowledge. Our programmes on offer enable our students to fulfill their academic, sporting and artistic potential and develop a positive and creative mindset that enables them to achieve success at school and in later life. To achieve this, our students not only have an excellent curriculum to help them academically and personally achieve, but a host of extra curricular activity opportunities that they can help bring out the very best in all of them.

The New Cairo British International School’s curriculum aims to promote learners’ intellectual, personal, social and physical development. As well as lessons and extracurricular activities, it includes approaches to teaching, learning and assessment, the quality of relationships within the school, and the values embodied in the way the school operates.

Our curriculum framework can be broken down into:

  • In  Key Stage 3, we follow the English National Curriculum with modifications made to cater to the needs and diversity of the student population at NCBIS.
  • In KS4 we offer a range of subjects at IGCSE and GCSE
  • In KS5 we offer the IB Diploma Programme in the Sixth form.

Key Stage 3 follows the English National Curriculum and all students will be expected to study the following subjects: Art, Drama, English, Geography, History, Computing, Mathematics, Modern Foreign Languages (French and a choice of Arabic, Spanish or German), Music, PSHE, Physical Education, and Science.

At the end of Key Stage 3 (Year 9) students choose their options for Years 10 and 11 where they study IGCSEs / GCSEs, refining their learning experience to suit their own interests and goals.

The curriculum at Key Stage 4 leads to a two-year course of study leading to external International / General Certificate of Secondary Education (IGCSE / GCSE) examinations. These courses are assessed and graded by coursework and external examination, set by London Examinations (EDEXCEL) Board.
All students study the following compulsory courses: English language, English literature, PSHE, Mathematics, PE, and Learning for Life (L4L). It must be noted that PE, PSHE and L4L do not lead to a formal qualification.
In addition to the above, students make 6 option choices from the following subjects: Arabic (1st language speakers), Art, Biology, Business Studies, Chemistry, Drama, Geography, History, Information and Communications Technology (ICT), Mathematics, Arabic (MFL), French, Spanish, German, Music, Physical Education and Physics. The combination of subjects studied as compulsory and those elected to be studied from the optional list, means that students study 9 subjects that lead to a formal qualification.
Parents' Evenings, PSHE sessions and Careers Guidance help both students and families to make these important subject choices. Individual help can also be sought at the Careers office or with Heads of Key Stage.
Careers information involves face to face meetings as well as the use of interactive software and personality tests.

The IB Diploma Programme students study six courses at higher level or standard level. Students must choose one subject from each of groups 1 to 5, thus ensuring breadth of experience in Languages, Humanities, the Experimental Sciences and Mathematics. The programme, which is taught over two years, has gained recognition and respect from the world’s leading universities, is offered by some 3000 IB World Schools in about 130 different countries.

Since the late 1960s, the programme has:
  • provided a package of education that balances subject breadth and depth, and considers the nature of knowledge across disciplines through the unique theory of knowledge course.
  • encouraged international-mindedness in IB students, starting with a foundation in their own language and culture.
  • developed a positive attitude to learning that prepares students for university education.
  • gained a reputation for its rigorous external assessment with published global standards, making this a qualification welcomed by universities worldwide.
  • emphasised the development of the whole student – physically, intellectually, emotionally and ethically.

Our Curriculum Guides

Key Stage 3 Curriculum Guide 2018-2019

Key Stage 4 Curriculum Guide 2017-2019

Key Stage 5 Curriculum Guide 2017-2019

The Careers Service at NCBIS

IB Diploma Programme

The IB Diploma Programme is designed as a challenging and balanced programme of education for students in Years 12 & 13, with final examinations that prepare students for success at university and life beyond.

The programme, which is taught over two years, has gained recognition and respect from the world’s leading universities, is offered by some 3000 IB World Schools in about 130 different countries.

Since the late 1960s, the programme has:
  • provided a package of education that balances subject breadth and depth, and considers the nature of knowledge across disciplines through the unique theory of knowledge course.
  • encouraged international-mindedness in IB students, starting with a foundation in their own language and culture.
  • developed a positive attitude to learning that prepares students for university education
  • gained a reputation for its rigorous external assessment with published global standards, making this a qualification welcomed by universities worldwide.
  • emphasised the development of the whole student – physically, intellectually, emotionally and ethically.

The Curriculum

IB Diploma Programme students study six courses at higher level or standard level. Students must choose one subject from each of groups 1 to 5, thus ensuring breadth of experience in Languages, Humanities, the Experimental Sciences and Mathematics

The sixth subject may be an arts subject chosen from group 6, or the student may choose another subject from groups 1 to 5.

At least three and not more than four subjects are taken at higher level (recommended 240 teaching hours), the others at standard level (150 teaching hours). These subjects are largely externally assessed by examinations in May of the second year, that is, Year13.

Students will develop an understanding of the IB learner profile. The ten aspirational qualities of the learner profile inspire and motivate the work of teachers, students and schools, providing a statement of the aims and values of the IB and a definition of what we mean by “international- mindedness”.

IB learners strive to be:

In addition, the programme has three core requirements that are included to broaden the educational experience and challenge students to apply their knowledge and understanding.

  • The Extended Essay is a requirement for students to engage in independent research through an in-depth study of a question relating to one of the subjects they are studying.
  • Theory of Knowledge is a course designed to encourage each student to reflect on the nature of knowledge by critically examining different ways of knowing (perception, emotion, language and reason) and different kinds of knowledge (scientific, artistic, mathematical and historical).
  • Creativity, Activity, Service requires that students actively learn from the experience of doing real tasks beyond the classroom. Students can combine all three components or do activities related to each one of them separately.

Assessment

Students take written examinations at the end of the programme (in May), which are marked by external IB examiners.

Students also complete assessment tasks in the school, which are either initially marked by teachers and then moderated by external moderators or sent directly to external examiners. The marks awarded for each course range from 1 (lowest) to 7 (highest). Students can also be awarded up to three additional points for their combined results on Theory of Knowledge and the Extended Essay. The Diploma is awarded to students who gain at least 24 points, subject to certain minimum levels of performance across the whole programme and to satisfactory participation in the Creativity, Activity, Service requirement. The highest total that a Diploma Programme student can be awarded is 45 points, though few students achieve this worldwide in any given year. NCBIS achieved a top score of 42 points in our first year of IB Diploma Examinations.

Assessment is criterion based, which means student performance is measured against pre-specified assessment criteria based on the aims and objectives of each subject curriculum, rather than the performance of other students taking the same examinations.

Creativity, Activity & Service (CAS)

All IB students must complete a CAS program throughout their IB Diploma Programme (lasts a minimum of 18 months). The CAS program includes documented evidence of participating in various experiences and at least one CAS project (minimum of one month’s duration) with a reasonable balance between creativity, activity, and service.

 

The component’s three strands:
  • Creativity – exploring and extending creative ideas that lead to an original product
  • Activity – physical exertion contributing to a healthy lifestyle
  • Service – collaborative and reciprocal engagement with the community in response to an authentic need

CAS encourages students to be involved in activities as individuals and as part of a team that take place in many contexts, both local and international. Participating in CAS experiences enables students to enhance their personal and interpersonal development as well as their social and civic development, through experiential learning, lending an important counterbalance to the academic pressures of the rest of the IB Diploma Programme. It should be both challenging and enjoyable – a personal journey of self-discovery that recognizes each student’s individual starting point.

 

CAS should involve:
  • Real, purposeful activities, which meet one or more of the learning outcomes.
  • Personal challenge, tasks must extend the student and be achievable in scope.
  • Students using the CAS stages (investigation, preparation, action, reflection, and demonstration) to guide CAS experiences and projects.
  • Thoughtful consideration, such as planning, reviewing progress, reporting (done on ManageBac).
  • Evidence and reflection on outcomes and personal learning.

Through your CAS experiences, you are to achieve the following learning outcomes:

  • Identify own strengths and develop areas for growth.
  • Demonstrate that challenges have been undertaken, developing new skills in the process.
  • Demonstrate how to initiate and plan a CAS experience.
  • Show commitment to and perseverance in CAS experiences.
  • Demonstrate the skills and recognize the benefits of working collaboratively.
  • Demonstrate engagement with issues of global significance.
  • Recognize and consider the ethics of choices and actions.

All outcomes must be present for a student to complete the CAS requirement. Some may be demonstrated many times, in a variety of activities, but completion requires only that there is some evidence for every outcome.

CAS: An IB Diploma & Graduation Requirement

A student who fails to satisfy the CAS requirement will not be awarded the IB diploma even if all other diploma conditions have been satisfactorily fulfilled.

IBDP CAS Guide

IB CAS Handbook 2018-19

CAS Feed

CAS Valentine’s Day

Our first Year 12 CAS project was completed last week by Hala, Nora and Noran. They did a great job organising logistics beforehand and implementing their project on the day. These 3 girls made others happy on Valentine’s Day by delivering roses and chocolates to students. Our first Year 12 CAS project was completed last week by Hala, Nora and Noran. They did a great job organising logistics beforehand and implementing their project on the day. These 3 girls made others happy on Valentine’s Day by delivering roses and chocolates…

Teaching English at Ahmed Zewail School

Our 2nd group to launch their CAS project has just begun implementing their English lessons that they developed to students of the Ahmed Zewail School. These students: Clara, Alinafe, Lara, Rafia and Nicole worked hard the last couple of weeks to figure out how to teach English to the young students of Ahmed Zewail School in an interesting and engaging manner. It was decided that they would do it through the final goal which is to make a book in English at whatever level they are at. Their first session last week was exciting for all.

Coaching Football to students

Another Service ECA started last week. Boys from the Ahmed Zewail School are welcomed onto our campus by the Year 12 and 13 students. Faisal, Mohannad, Yehya and Basel coached these boys for an hour and will regularly do so to help them develop more skills and give them another opportunity to play. The ECA ended with very tired boys all around.

Career Services

Introduction to University Applications Guidance:

New Cairo British International School helps students build upon their positive experiences at NCBIS to gain admission into colleges and universities all over the world. Applying to colleges and universities is an exciting and revealing experience which gives you a chance to look at who you are, what you value, and what you might want to do with your life. The NCBIS Head of Careers helps guide, support and counsel students as they research universities/colleges, make choices, select and visit universities and complete applications. Many universities are university reps visit NCBIS throughout the year to give students more information about a variety of different institutions.

The NCBIS Head of Careers also helps coordinate summer programs, internships and work placement opportunities for students that are interested in order to gain experience for their CVs.

Student Responsibilities in the University Application Process

For students in Year 12 and 13, the university application process is the first step towards individual independence. It is a complicated, demanding and time-consuming process. It can also be an exciting and enriching experience. You will have to do a lot of research and spend a lot of time filling out applications and writing personal essays. However, this will give you a chance to look at who you are, what you value and what you want to do with your life. You will have to make some important decisions, develop self-reliance and confidence, and perhaps for the first time think about life on your own, outside the environment of your family life. Due to the time required to complete successful university applications, NCBIS limits students to 10 applications in total

Suggestions for students in Year 11:
  • Choosing IB Courses – Make sure to do some research regarding what you’d like to study at university in order to make informed decisions about which IB courses to take.
  • Make an appointment to talk to the Head of Careers to see what the best options are for you.
Suggestions for students in Year 12:
Create a “Short list of universities”
  • Narrow your list of universities/colleges to between 5 and 10. Meet with the Head of Careers about your college choices.

 

Create a master list or calendar that includes:
  • Tests you’ll take and their fees, dates, and registration deadlines
  • College application due dates
  • Required financial aid application forms and their deadlines
  • Other materials you’ll need (recommendations, transcripts, etc.)

 

Prepare early decision/early action or rolling admission applications as soon as possible:
  • October 15 of your Year 13 year is the deadline for Oxbridge applications and applications for Medicine/Veterinary in the UK
  • Nov. 1–15: Colleges may require test scores and applications between these dates for early decision admission in the US
Suggestions for students in Year 13:

All students interested in applying to universities abroad should be completing this process from September to December.

There are exceptions and differences for each region and country! So speak to the Head of Careers and do your research early!

For EXAMPLE:
  • To apply to UK Universities, a website called UCAS.com is used. NCBIS is a UCAS center, so your Head of Careers will have a “Buzzword” that you will need in order to apply.
  • To apply to universities/colleges in the United States CommonApp.org is a website that SOME universities use, other colleges may have a different platform, and others still will require you to apply through their own website. You will need to complete the SAT requirements for most colleges, unless you are applying to a college that is “test optional.”
  • For Universities in Ontario, Canada you apply through OUAC.on.ca, but in some cases it is better to apply to the university DIRECTLY.
  • For Universities in Europe, you will need to apply through the website directly, and some will ask you to have a CV prepared.
  • There are some universities in Egypt that NCBIS students can apply to, speak to your Head of Careers for more information on this.
Basic items that should be taken care of for applications are:
  1. Asking for letters of reference from teachers of relevant subjects and following up on receiving them.
  2. Completing the TOEFL or IELTS test, and giving yourself time to repeat it if necessary.

    Students can register and take the TOEFL exam through AMIDEAST. IELTS can be taken through The British Council. Both exams contain a speaking, reading, writing and listening component.

  3. Filling out the applications for the universities that you are interested in applying to and communicating with the university’s admissions center if more details or information is needed to complete the application.
Please Note: Applying to universities involves completing many steps and each university has their own requirements and expectations from their applicants so students should start the process as early as possible and take note of all application deadlines.

Where do you want to study?

When asking this question, you should first realise that the IB Diploma is a rigorous and demanding programme that provides you with a first-class preparation for your future after NCBIS. Students follow a course of study with a global reputation for academic excellence, and universities throughout the world recognise the IB Diploma as an entrance qualification to higher education degree courses. In some countries, such as the United States or Canada, the IB Diploma qualifies students for advanced placement or academic credits; furthermore, students with the IB Diploma are accepted at a higher rate at selective US universities than those with other qualifications. In general, European universities prefer the IB Diploma for entrance over IB Diploma Courses results. European and Canadian universities may require a SAT, if a student only has an IB Certificates/Diploma Courses.

Resources for researching courses and universities:

  • The official UCAS (University Counseling webpage) Students applying to UK universities must apply through the UCAS site (www.ucas.com) for most courses. This site has all the information students need to research courses, universities, get advice for writing personal statements, and more.
  • University websites Every college and university maintains it own website offering all information on courses, programmes, course and application requirements, and even virtual tours of the campus.
  • Facebook, YouTube, and Twitter Universities offer social networks with current students as well as videos and other forms of communication for prospective students to gather more information about schools.
  • Eunicas is a website (http://www.eunicas.ie/) which can search all university programmes in Europe which are taught in English. Please note that fees quoted are for EU nationals/residence. Not recommended that you apply through Eunicas, but just use it as a reference tool.
  • Reference Materials The school maintains a university reference section in the school library and the Head of Careers Office which included university prospectus, university brochures and university guidebooks. Some of the very helpful guidebooks include: The Times Good University Guide, How to complete your UCAS application, How to write your UCAS personal statement, the Barron’s Profiles of American Colleges.
  • Summer and School Holiday visits Students should plan to visit universities where they have an interest in applying. This is an excellent way to help narrow your college choices. In the UK, Open Days – where the university departments open their doors to introduce prospective students to the facilities, tutors and programmes – are an excellent way to learn more about the course and university. Universities list their Open Days on their websites as well as under Open Days on the UCAS site. Most universities also offer daily tours or self-guided walks.
Please click on “The Careers Service at NCBIS” below, for a comprehensive overview of our Secondary Careers Programme.

The Careers Service at NCBIS

Challenges Week

Challenges Week sees all students from the Secondary school have the chance to join a week of experiential learning outside of the classroom walls.

Philosophy and rationale

“Challenges week” forms part of our wider experiential curriculum and is part of our “Learning for Life” programme at NCBIS. Challenges week activities provide rich, character building experiences that we hope will awaken a student’s interest, or spark a passion in areas that they may never have experienced previously.
These areas include:

  • C – creativity, culture & curriculum
  • A – action & adventure
  • S – service

(NB Although the CAS focus of our trips relates to the philosophy of IBDP CAS, no trip counts towards fulfilling the IBDP CAS requirements)

NCBIS believes that Challenges week should serve the purpose of enhancing the standard curriculum and provide students with opportunities for cultural enrichment, service to others, adventure activities and travel, whilst making the student body more internationally minded and better global citizens. The NCBIS programme is designed to give students the experiences that will inspire them and which fit in with the ethos of the IB diploma programme at NCBIS. Challenges week looks to provide unique educational experiences and we strongly believe that it provides NCBIS students with an edge when they apply to future colleges and universities.

Objectives of NCBIS Challenges week

  • To reinforce self-esteem and provide a sense of achievement
  • To partake in an activity that is unique, challenging, and educational
  • To provide opportunities for service learning, adventure and both curricular and cultural experiences
  • To enjoy authentic outdoor experiences, where they may be challenged both mentally and physically
  • To reinforce skills and content from the existing curriculum, or learn new skills
  • To gain an increased sense of independence and responsibility
  • To learn to co-operate in a group situation with their peers as well as adults
  • To allow students the opportunity to forge stronger links between the classroom and the wider world
  • To understand new cultures, people, places, economies and environments
  • To be curious about, and sensitive to, human diversity; including the cultures and social issues of the host country
  • To work and communicate effectively and sensitively with people from diverse backgrounds, life-styles, and cultures

Our aim is to provide a wide range of activities with a range of independence and cost, so that all students can access an experiential learning week, fulfilling one or more of the objectives above.

If you have any queries, please do not hesitate to contact Kevin Rossall, Deputy Head of Secondary,

kevin.rossall@ncbis.co.uk

Challenges Week 2018/2019

Cambodia

NCBIS Secondary students representing Years 9, 10 and 11, explored the exotic and varied delights of Cambodia for Challenges Week, 2019. In Phnom Penh, the 22 students braved the humidity to undertake a 20km bike ride along some scenic rural pathways, and in Siem Reap, came close to eating fried tarantulas as well as seeing one of the seven man-made wonders of the world, the Buddhist temple of Angkor Wat. The students also pushed themselves by taking part in a circus workshop and enjoyed some serenity when visiting a floating village to see how some locals have adapted to their landscape. The students watched a Khmer traditional dance performance while they had a buffet dinner. Furthermore, they participated in a Khmer cooking lesson and actually enjoyed eating the delicious food they made. The students were a credit to the school and to Cairo, truly embracing the spirit and ethos of Challenges Week.

Italy

NCBIS Secondary students representing Years 9, 10 and 11, explored the exotic and varied delights of Cambodia for Challenges Week, 2019. In Phnom Penh, the 22 students braved the humidity to undertake a 20km bike ride along some scenic rural pathways, and in Siem Reap, came close to eating fried tarantulas as well as seeing one of the seven man-made wonders of the world, the Buddhist temple of Angkor Wat. The students also pushed themselves by taking part in a circus workshop and enjoyed some serenity when visiting a floating village to see how some locals have adapted to their landscape. The students watched a Khmer traditional dance performance while they had a buffet dinner. Furthermore, they participated in a Khmer cooking lesson and actually enjoyed eating the delicious food they made. The students were a credit to the school and to Cairo, truly embracing the spirit and ethos of Challenges Week.

Marsa Alam – Egypt

On the 1st March 2019, NCBIS took 71 students on a scuba diving trip to the Marsa Nakari dive village, located 20km south of the beautiful area of Marsa Alam on the Red Sea. The students on the trip were all looking to either get certified as Openwater (Beginner) or Advanced divers. The students who were already advanced then joined the trip as recreational divers who were taken on more technical dives outside the house reef to further their skills. Almost every student who went on the trip achieved the aim of becoming certified to their appropriate level, making it a huge success. It was the biggest trip we have ever run as a school and we are immensely proud of all the students who showed great resilience in overcoming the many challenges they faced during the week. They will have these qualifications for the rest of their lives meaning that their scuba diving journeys have only just begun!

International Award

The International Award concept is one of individual challenge, and presents to young people a balanced, non-competitive programme which encourages a spirit of adventure, personal discovery, self confidence, perseverance, leadership, teamwork and service to the community. It is recognised worldwide and viewed very favourably by leading universities and businesses.

NCBIS has been running the Duke of Edinburgh International Award for over ten years. In order to gain the Award, students take part in weekly activities across the three sections of Physical Recreation, Service and Skills. We also run Adventurous Journeys, with expeditions in the nearby Wadi Degla Reserve and the Akamas peninsula in Cyprus.

For more information regarding this award, please go to Duke of Edinburgh International Award

Please click here for the Online Record Book

Secondary School Staff

John Bagust

John Bagust

Principal

John.Bagust@ncbis.co.uk

Secondary School

Biography
David Mate

David Mate

Head of Secondary

david.mate@ncbis.co.uk

Secondary School

Biography
Kevin Rossall

Kevin Rossall

Deputy Head of Secondary (Student Welfare)

kevin.rossall@ncbis.co.uk

Secondary School

Biography
Tobias Bate

Tobias Bate

Deputy Head of Secondary (Academic)

tobias.bate@ncbis.co.uk

Secondary School

Biography
Laura Cook

Laura Cook

Head of Key Stage 3

laura.cook@ncbis.co.uk

Secondary School

Biography
Nadia Gilchrist

Nadia Gilchrist

Head of Key Stage 4

nadia.gilchrist@ncbis.co.uk

Science

Biography
Paul Highdale

Paul Highdale

Associate Assistant Head Teacher Head of KS5, IB Diploma Coordinator and Science Teacher

Pastoral Team and Science Department

paul.highdale@ncbis.co.uk

Science

Biography
Shery Takawy

Shery Takawy

Head of Careers and Higher Education Guidance

Counselling

shery.takawy@ncbis.co.uk

Secondary School

Biography
Jennifer Surujpaul

Jennifer Surujpaul

Director of IT

jennifer.surujpaul@ncbis.co.uk

Secondary School

Biography
Rebekah Thompson

Rebekah Thompson

Head of Music and Drama / Director of Performing Arts

rebekah.thompson@ncbis.co.uk

Secondary School

Biography
Claire Simpson

Claire Simpson

SENCO Head of Inclusive Learning

claire.simpson@ncbis.co.uk

Secondary School

Biography
Alex Stagogiannis

Alex Stagogiannis

Head Of Languages

Head of Languages

Secondary School

Biography
Jonny Clements

Jonny Clements

Director of Sport

PE Department

jonathan.clements@ncbis.co.uk

Secondary School

Biography
Jag Khurana

Jag Khurana

Teacher of English

jag.khurana@ncbis.co.uk

Secondary School

Biography
Jon O’Neill

Jon O’Neill

Head of Maths & Computing

jon.o'neill@ncbis.co.uk

Secondary School

Biography
Rachel Mcmullan

Rachel Mcmullan

Head of Art

The Arts

rachel.mcmullan@ncbis.co.uk

Secondary School

Biography
Gurpreet Garewal

Gurpreet Garewal

Head of Humanities/ Economics and Business Studies Teacher

gurpreet.garewal@ncbis.co.uk

Secondary School

Biography
Laura Berry

Laura Berry

Teacher of Art and Design

The Arts

laura.berry@ncbis.co.uk

Secondary School

Biography
Allison Rajab

Allison Rajab

Drama and Arts Teacher

Arts and Drama

allison.rajab@ncbis.co.uk

Secondary School

Biography
Peter Beadell

Peter Beadell

Teacher of Music

The Performing Arts Department

peter.beadell@ncbis.co.uk

Secondary School

Biography
Lala Akhundova

Lala Akhundova

Music Teacher

The Performing Arts Department

lala.akhundova@ncbis.co.uk

Secondary School

Biography
Andrew Davison

Andrew Davison

Drama Teacher

Drama

andrew.davison@ncbis.co.uk

Secondary School

Biography
Stacey Mate

Stacey Mate

Head of English

stacey.mate@ncbis.co.uk

Secondary School

Biography
Vicky Bramley

Vicky Bramley

Teacher of English

vicky.bramley@ncbis.co.uk

Secondary School

Biography
Katheen Boylan

Katheen Boylan

Teacher of English and TOK Coordinator

kathleen.boylan@ncbis.co.uk

Secondary School

Biography
James Bannister

James Bannister

English Teacher

English Department

james.bannister@ncbis.co.uk

Secondary School

Biography
Gini Marshall

Gini Marshall

Secondary School Counsellor

Pastoral Department

gini.marshall@ncbis.co.uk

Secondary School

Biography
Adam Norton

Adam Norton

Geography Teacher

adam.norton@ncbis.co.uk

Secondary School

Biography
Stephen Parr

Stephen Parr

History and Theory of Knowledge Teacher

stephen.parr@ncbcis.co.uk

Secondary School

Biography
John Holland

John Holland

Teacher of History and Geography

john.holland@ncbis.co.uk

Secondary School

Biography
Michelle Robinson

Michelle Robinson

Business Studies Teacher

Michelle.Robinson@ncbis.co.uk

Secondary School

Biography
June Harvey

June Harvey

Psychology Teacher

june.harvey@ncbis.co.uk

Secondary School

Biography
Ronald Entwistle

Ronald Entwistle

Teacher of Maths

ronald.entwistle@ncbis.co.uk

Secondary School

Biography
Christina Rajan

Christina Rajan

Teacher of Maths

christina.rajan@ncbis.co.uk

Secondary School

Biography
Jamie Rizk

Jamie Rizk

Maths Teacher

Jamie.rizk@ncbis.co.uk

Secondary School

Biography
Yaa Essel

Yaa Essel

Teacher of Maths

yaa.essel@ncbis.co.uk

Secondary School

Biography
Malcolm Howe

Malcolm Howe

Computing Teacher

malcolm.howe@outlook.com

Secondary School

Biography
Ahmed Hossam

Ahmed Hossam

Arabic Teacher

Modern Foreign languages Department

ahmed.hossam@ncbis.co.uk

Secondary School

Biography
Waleed Ayed

Waleed Ayed

Arabic Teacher

Modern Foreign languages Department

waleed.ayed@ncbis.co.uk

Secondary School

Biography
Ghada Osama

Ghada Osama

Arabic Teacher

Modern Foreign languages Department

ghada.osama@ncbis.co.uk

Secondary School

Biography
Claudia LoPresti

Claudia LoPresti

French Teacher

Modern Foreign languages Department

claudia.lopresti@ncbis.co.uk

Secondary School

Biography
Yves Joly

Yves Joly

French/ Spanish Teacher

MFL Department

yves.joly@ncbis.co.uk

Secondary School

Biography
Salam Leila Atallah

Salam Leila Atallah

German Teacher

Modern Foreign languages Department

salam.atallah@ncbis.co.uk

Secondary School

Biography
Maria del Mar Brat

Maria del Mar Brat

Spanish teacher

Modern Foreign languages Department

maria.delmarbrat@ncbis.co.uk

Secondary School

Biography
Monica Naranjo

Monica Naranjo

Spanish teacher

Modern Foreign languages Department

monica.naranjo@ncbis.co.uk

Secondary School

Biography
Esraa Abdelrahman

Esraa Abdelrahman

Inclusive Learning Assistant

Inclusive Learning Department

esraa.abdelrahman@ncbis.co.uk

Secondary School

Biography
Vinton Rankin

Vinton Rankin

Key Stage 3 Mentor

Pastoral Department

Vinton.rankin@ncbis.co.uk

Secondary School

Biography
Nicholas Nolan

Nicholas Nolan

EAL Teacher

Inclusive Learning Department

Nicolas.nolan@ncbis.co.uk

Secondary School

Biography
Nermine Fam

Nermine Fam

Inclusive Learning Coordinator

Inclusive Learning Department

nermine.fam@ncbis.co.uk

Secondary School

Biography
Nihal Ezz El Din

Nihal Ezz El Din

Inclusive Learning Assistant

Inclusive Learning Department

nihal.ezzeldin@ncbis.co.uk

Secondary School

Biography
Alicia El-Khatib

Alicia El-Khatib

Inclusive Learning Assistant

Inclusive Learning Department

alicia.elkhatib@ncbis.co.uk

Secondary School

Biography
Marwa Mamdouh

Marwa Mamdouh

Inclusive Learning Assistant

Inclusive Learning Department

marwa.mamdouh@ncbis.co.uk

Secondary School

Biography
Raghda Abulnour

Raghda Abulnour

Science and Biology Teacher

Science Department

raghda.abulnour@ncbis.co.uk

Secondary School

Biography
John Masefield

John Masefield

Physics and Science Teacher

john.masefield@ncbis.co.uk

Secondary School

Biography
Sukhvinder Mundra

Sukhvinder Mundra

Teacher of Physics

Science Department

sukhinder.mundra@ncbis.co.uk

Secondary School

Biography
Susie Belal

Susie Belal

CAS and EE Coordinator and Chemistry teacher

susie.belal@ncbis.co.uk

Secondary School

Biography
Thomas Bradshaw

Thomas Bradshaw

Teacher of Physical Education

PE Department

thomas.bradshaw@ncbis.co.uk

Secondary School

Biography
Anna Mike

Anna Mike

Teacher of Physical Education

PE Department

anna.mike@ncbis.co.uk

Secondary School

Biography
Zaheer Abbas

Zaheer Abbas

ECA Coordinator

PE Department

zaheer.abbas@ncbis.co.uk

Secondary School

Biography
Lilianne Tadros

Lilianne Tadros

Secondary Office Manager

Administrative Team

lilianne.tadros@ncbis.co.uk

Administration

Biography
Rania Fadl

Rania Fadl

Personal Assistant to the Secondary Leadership Team & Examination officer

Administrative Team

rania.fadl@ncbis.co.uk

Administration

Biography
Mayada Hatem

Mayada Hatem

Secondary Administrative Services Officer & Displays Designer

Administrative Team

mayada.hatem@ncbis.co.uk

Administration

Biography

Inclusive Learning

At NCBIS we recognise that all students have individual needs regarding the rate and manner in which they learn and progress. We believe that all students can benefit from a range of learning approaches that consider their diverse needs and backgrounds, and we are committed to an inclusive learning culture where students of all abilities and educational needs can participate, make progress and feel valued.

Personalised learning programmes with specialist teachers

Whether your child requires English as an Additional Language (EAL), short term booster support or a more structured personal learning plan, NCBIS provides a range of additional and specialist learning support programmes to help your child maximise their potential, their gifts and their talents. Our strong and versatile whole school team of inclusive learning specialists focuses on early identification of any learning needs and on supporting all our students in successfully accessing the curriculum – from Early Years right through to IB Diploma level.

Levels of support

We graduate our levels of support to meet the changing needs of each individual student. Our learners can move between these flexible learning levels as they require more, or less, support.

Level 1

Quality first teaching provides support delivered through quality first teaching in a differentiated mainstream classroom. This level of support targets maximum access for all learners and offers extended learning challenges for high potential, gifted and talented learners. Our inclusive learning specialists work with all class teachers in supporting quality first teaching and helping to fine-tune specific learning techniques that work for each individual child.

Level 2

Booster/ short-term targeted support meets students’ needs within the mainstream classroom and students also are withdrawn from class once or twice a week for specialist support. This level of support includes students who are studying English as an Additional Language, an intensive English language course with personalised targets set for each learner.

Level 3

Longer term targeted support is provided by specialist teachers for learners who have specialist reports and assessments. This support ensures that our children receive highly tailored support linked with precise personal targets and with time scales agreed by students, parents and teachers.

English as an Additional Language

Children who do not speak English as their first language can access English language support with our English as an Additional Language (EAL) personalised programmes. Before or on entry to the school we assess their English speaking, listening, reading and writing proficiency in order to determine the level of support needed for them to access the mainstream curriculum.

 EAL teachers and inclusive learning specialists then work closely with classroom teachers to ensure that your child’s English language needs are met in the mainstream classroom.  If your child is identified as requiring additional EAL support to develop their English Language skills, they will also attend EAL lessons taught by EAL specialist teachers.  

Additional Educational Needs at NCBIS

Additional needs are experienced by students who do not necessarily have a specific learning difficulty but who are faced with additional challenges. These may arise, for example, if your child has transferred from a school with a different curriculum or language of instruction, or when a child falls behind in their learning or finds they are underachieving. Learners with high potential abilities, gifts and talents also benefit from individualised learning targets and support.

We focus on early identification of all additional needs. Our learning specialists provide understanding and support so that we can minimise any barriers to learning faced by your child.

Supporting our high potential, gifted and talented learners

NCBIS recognises that high potential learners can require additional support and challenges to develop their abilities; if high potential learners are well catered for, they are more likely to be engaged in their learning and contribute positively in all areas at school.  

We identify these learners and provide opportunities for them to develop their abilities, gifts and talents both inside the classroom and through extra-curricular enrichment activities. We offer specialist advice for both families and teachers as we join together to inspire and celebrate these learners’ ever-evolving achievements.

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